A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens


A Tale of Two CitiesA Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A re-read with Catie, Hayes, Geevee, Kim, Marialyce, Laura, MichelleCH, Jemidar, Margaret, Jeannette, Dawn and Sylvia.

Page 1:
It was the best of times,
it was the worst of times,
it was the age of wisdom,
it was the age of foolishness,
it was the epoch of belief,
it was the epoch of incredulity,
it was the season of Light,
it was the season of Darkness,
it was the spring of hope,
it was the winter of despair,
we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way— in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

Page 1:
There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever.

Page 10:
A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. A solemn consideration, when I enter a great city by night, that every one of those darkly clustered houses encloses its own secret; that every room in every one of them encloses its own secret; that every beating heart in the hundreds of thousands of breasts there, is, in some of its imaginings, a secret to the heart nearest it!

Page 25:
The time was to come, when that wine too would be spilled on the street-stones, and when the stain of it would be red upon many there.

Page 79:
Sadly, sadly, the sun rose; it rose upon no sadder sight than the man of good abilities and good emotions, incapable of their directed exercise, incapable of his own help and his own happiness, sensible of the blight on him, and resigning himself to let it eat him away.

Page 93:
The leprosy of unreality disfigured every human creature in attendance upon Monseigneur.

Page 97:
The water of the fountain ran, the swift river ran, the day ran into evening, so much life in the city ran into death according to rule, time and tide waited for no man, the rats were sleeping close together in their dark holes again, the Fancy Ball was lighted up at supper, all things ran their course.

Page 331:
Crush humanity out of shape once more, under similar hammers, and it will twist itself into the same tortured forms. Sow the same seed of rapacious license and oppression over again, and it will surely yield the same fruit according to its kind.

Page 335:
“It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.”

I read many books on the French Revolution but Dickens was able to write a splendid and unforgettable book about this tragic historical period.

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