The Law and the Lady by Wilkie Collins


Wilkie Collins by Millais 1851

Wilkie Collins by Millais 1851 (Photo credit: Martin Beek)

 

The Law and the LadyThe Law and the Lady by Wilkie Collins

 

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

 

Free download available at Gutenberg Project

 

The audio version can be found at LibriVox

 

See The Readers Review: Literature from 1800 to 1910 discussion for the reading schedule for this book.

 

Part I

 

Feb. 1-7: Chapters 1-14

 

Part 2

 

Feb. 8-14: Chapters 15-29
Feb. 15-21: Chapters 30-44
Feb. 22-28: Chapters 45-50

 

ADDRESSED TO THE READER.

 

IN offering this book to you, I have no Preface to write. I have only to request that you will bear in mind certain established truths, which occasionally escape your memory when you are reading a work of fiction. Be pleased, then, to remember (First): That the actions of human beings are not invariably governed by the laws of pure reason. (Secondly): That we are by no means always in the habit of bestowing our love on the objects which are the most deserving of it, in the opinions of our friends. (Thirdly and Lastly): That Characters which may not have appeared, and Events which may not have taken place, within the limits of our own individual experience, may nevertheless be perfectly natural Characters and perfectly probable Events, for all that. Having said these few words, I have said all that seems to be necessary at the present time, in presenting my new Story to your notice.

 

W. C.

 

LONDON, February 1, 1875.

 

Wilkie Collins is a master in telling a thrilling story with plenty of suspense and gothic elements. The story is told in a flashback way and the author makes use of the main feminine character as the detective’s story: she investigates the Scotch verdict against her husband.

 

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