The Channel Islands – Beautiful Britain series by Joseph E. Morris


Map of Channel Islands

Map of Channel Islands (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The Channel Islands - Beautiful Britain seriesThe Channel Islands – Beautiful Britain series by Joseph E. Morris

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

 

Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

 

Page 6:
Contrast with this proximity the long stretches of open sea that separate these islands from Weymouth or Southampton, and we begin to realize how, physically at any rate, Jersey is more properly France than England:

 

Elle est pour nous la France, et, dans son lit des fleurs,
Elle en a le sourire et quelquefois les pleurs.

 

Page 9 – THE CASQUET ROCKS AND LIGHTHOUSE.

This group of rocks lies N.N.E. of Guernsey, and is passed by the steamers which serve the islands from England.

 

Page 13:
Less than a decade later and the walls of Mont Orgueil witnessed still blacker tragedy. The quarrel of the Bandinels and the Carterets is an ugly page of history that almost recalls in its unrelenting ferocity some of the worst clan “vendettas” of the Highlands.

 

Page 16 – MOUNT ORGUEIL CASTLE, JERSEY.

The name, meaning “Mount of Pride,” is said to have been given to the castle after Sir Reginald de Carteret’s successful defence of it against du Guesclin in 1374.

 

Mont Orgueil was unsuccessfully besieged by the French under the leadership of the Duc de Bourbon and the great Bertrand du Guesclin, Marshal of France (whose splendid tomb may still be seen in the north chapel of St. Laurent, at Le Puy), in 1374. It was in honour of this achievement that it received its present name from Thomas, Duke of Clarence, and brother of Henry V.

 

Page 20:
Most of the interest of Jersey, however, except its fields of giant cabbage-stalks, and its green lanes of quaint little pollarded trees, will probably be found on the sea-coast, or near it.

 

page 23:
St. Helier possesses yet other claims to historical distinction, in the mystery of James de la Cloche. This last was the eldest illegitimate son of Charles II., and is known to have been a Jerseyman. His story has recently attracted much attention; and Mr. Andrew Lang, in his Valet’s Tragedy, once even went so far as to suggest that de la Cloche was “The Man with the Iron Mask.” This theory he afterwards abandoned; but it is still stoutly maintained by Miss Edith Carey in her beautiful volume on the Channel Islands.

 

Page 25 – LA CORBIÈRE LIGHTHOUSE, JERSEY.

The white tower stands at the extremity of a particularly dangerous reef.

 

Page 27 – THE NEEDLE ROCK, GRÈVE AU LANÇON, JERSEY.

 

page 30 – THE PEA STACKS (TAS DE POIS), JERBOURG, GUERNSEY.

Isolated and wall-sided masses of rock of this type are typical of the Channel Islands.

 

Page 33:
Guernsey, in fact, is supposed to have become an island at least 14,000 years ago, whilst Jersey was torn asunder from France not more than 3,000 years before Christ. Guernsey thus received only the Continental fauna that flourished at the period of its final insulation.

 

MOULIN HUET, GUERNSEY.

A particularly attractive bay on the southern side of the island.

 

Page 38:
Historically the chief interest of Guernsey is comparatively recent, and centres round the residence here of Victor Hugo. After the Coup d’État Hugo settled first in Jersey, where he occupied a house in Marine Terrace.

 

Page 40:
It is pleasanter to picture Victor Hugo at Guernsey, writing here his novel, Les Travailleurs de la Mer—the scene of which is laid at Torteval, in the extreme south-west corner of the island—and always looking longingly towards the invisible shores of France, than to dwell on certain other episodes in the history of the island, which, however disagreeable, cannot lightly be put aside.

 

Page 43 – HERM AND JETHOU FROM GUERNSEY.

These two little islands add greatly to the picturesqueness of the scenery of the eastern shores of Guernsey.

 

Page 46 – A FIELD OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS IN GUERNSEY.

The climate encourages the growing of flowers, and the northern half of the island is mostly devoted to this industry.

 

Page 49 – THE COUPÉE, SARK.

A romantic and almost terrifying pathway among the precipitous rocks of the island.

 

Page 56 – THE SISTER ROCKS, ALDERNEY.

This island is generally ignored by visitors to the group, but the quaint little town of St. Anne and the fine rocks at the southern end are quite worth seeing.

 

Page 61:
Of the smaller islands of the Norman archipelago only a word or two need be added here. Roughly halfway between Sark and Guernsey, and separated from each other by a narrow passage that is difficult to navigate by reason of its hidden rocks and surging tides, are the small twin islands of Jethou and Herm. The latter is now occupied by a German Prince, the great-grandson of the famous Prussian leader, the exact place of whose meeting with Wellington after the field of Waterloo—whether at Belle Alliance, or farther along the road towards Genappe—has often been made the topic of historical discussion, and is anyhow the subject of a well-known picture.

 

 

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