Book review: The Romanov Sisters by Helen Rappaport


The Romanov SistersThe Romanov Sisters by Helen Rappaport

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I received this book as a digital ARC from the publisher through Net Galley in return for an honest review.

Since the author is a writer historian russanist, this book majestically describes the life of the Romanovs, even if the title gives a false impression on the main plot. How to describe the sisters’ life without mentioning their parents, Nicholas and Alexandra, and even their poor hemophiliac brother Alexey?

The book starts with the description of the married life of Nicholas and Alexandra, a favorite grandchild of Queen Victoria.

Through the description of the four sisters, Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Alexandra, the author describes their almost recluse lives in the beautiful Tsarskoe Selo (built by the Empress Catherine the Great) and Livadia (summer-house) palaces due to Nicholas’ fear of terrorist attack on his family.


Catherine Palace with a view of the Cameron Gallery; Tsarskoye Selo in a watercolor by Luigi Premazzi, c. 1855.

The story is enriched with plenty of archived letters and photographs (not available in this ARC copy) which give us the true feelings of this famous Royal family during their entire life.

It should be mentioned the famous historical and controversial character, Rasputin, who played an important role in the Romanov family, specially in Alexey’s anytime his health was worsen.


Alexandra Feodorovna with her children, Rasputin and a governess in 1908

The author have previously published another book The Last Days of the Romanovs: Tragedy at Ekaterinburg which counts down to the last, tense hours of the family’s lives.

I really liked this book since the author gives us important insights of the Romanov’s without making use of any artificial and romantically hints of the whole story. There are plenty of fiction books based on the Romanov family, including their final and tragical faith.

There is an interesting list of books The Best Romanov Books with some additional reading on this Russian Royal family.

Additionally, there is a list of films about the Romanovs.

View all my reviews

Since the author is a writer historian russanist, this book majestically describes the life of the Romanovs, even if the title gives a false impression on the main plot. How to describe the sisters’ life without mentioning their parents, Nicholas and Alexandra, and even their poor hemophiliac brother Alexey?

The book starts with the description of the married life of Nicholas and Alexandra, a favorite grandchild of Queen Victoria.

Through the description of the four sisters, Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Alexandra, the author describes their almost recluse lives in the beautiful Tsarskoe Selo (built by the Empress Catherine the Great) and Livadia (summer-house) palaces due to Nicholas’ fear of terrorist attack on his family.


Catherine Palace with a view of the Cameron Gallery; Tsarskoye Selo in a watercolor by Luigi Premazzi, c. 1855.

The story is enriched with plenty of archived letters and photographs (not available in this ARC copy) which give us the true feelings of this famous Royal family during their entire life.

It should be mentioned the famous historical and controversial character, Rasputin, who played an important role in the Romanov family, specially in Alexey’s anytime his health was worsen.


Alexandra Feodorovna with her children, Rasputin and a governess in 1908

The author have previously published another book The Last Days of the Romanovs: Tragedy at Ekaterinburg which counts down to the last, tense hours of the family’s lives.

I really liked this book since the author gives us important insights of the Romanov’s without making use of any artificial and romantically hints of the whole story. There are plenty of fiction books based on the Romanov family, including their final and tragical faith.

There is an interesting list of books The Best Romanov Books with some additional reading on this Russian Royal family.

Additionally, there is a list of films about the Romanovs.

Related link:

Flashlight Commentary.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s