Book review: The Marble Faun: Or, the Romance of Monte Beni, Volumes 1&2 by Nathaniel Hawthorne


The Marble Faun: Or, the Romance of Monte Beni, Volume 1The Marble Faun: Or, the Romance of Monte Beni, Volume 1 by Nathaniel Hawthorne
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

Loving it and I’ve already started Vol II.

Loc 1554:

One of the chief causes that make Rome the favorite residence of artists – their ideal home which they sigh for in advance, and are so loath to migrate from, after once breathing its enchanted air – is, doubtless, that they there find themselves in force, and are numerous enough to create a congenial atmosphere. In every other clime they are isolated strangers; in this land of art, they are free citizens.

 

The Marble Faun V. 2 (Oxford World's Classics)The Marble Faun V. 2 by Nathaniel Hawthorne
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

An astonished masterpiece written on the eve of the American Civil War.

From Wiki:
This Romance focuses on four main characters: Miriam, Hilda, Kenyon, and Donatello.

Miriam is a beautiful painter with an unknown past. Throughout the novel, she is compared to many other women including Eve, Beatrice Cenci, Judith, and Cleopatra. Miriam is pursued by a mysterious, threatening man who is her “evil genius” through life. Hilda is an innocent copyist. She is compared to the Virgin Mary and the white dove. Her simple, unbendable moral principles can make her severe in spite of her tender heart. Miriam and Hilda are often contrasted.

Kenyon is a sculptor who represents rationalist humanism. He cherishes a romantic affection towards Hilda. Donatello, the Count of Monte Beni, is often compared to Adam and is in love with Miriam. Donatello amazingly resembles the marble Faun of Praxiteles, and the novel plays with the characters’ belief that the Count may be a descendant of the antique Faun. Hawthorne, however, withholds a definite statement even in the novel’s concluding chapters and postscript.

There are at least 7 versions of the statue “Resting Satyr”:
Capitoline Museums;
Roman artwork sculpted in marble between 150 and 175 CE, in Prado Museum, Spain.
Resting Satyr. Roman copy after the mid-4th century B.C, marble, height 168 cm, in Hermitage Museum, Russia.
Resting Satyr (Satyrus anapauomenos). Roman copy of the 2nd century CE, in Hermitage Museum, Russia. Inv. No. Гр. 3058 / A.154.
Resting Satyr, 2nd century AD, Royal Castle, Warsaw, Poland.
Resting Satyr, Roman copy of the 2nd century, marble, height 180 cm, in Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, Denmark. Inv. No. 474.
Resting Satyr, Roman copy, first half of the 2nd cent. Carrara marble, height (without pedestal) 1.78 m, width of the statue 0.76 m, height of the pedestal 0.08 m., Santa Maria Capua Vetere, Archaeological Museum of ancient Capua, Italy.


Capitoline Faun, exemplar from the Capitoline Museums, c. 130 AD (inv. 739)

5* The Scarlet Letter
4* Rappaccini’s Daughter
3* Wakefield ; Ethan Brand
3* The Ambitious Guest
3* The Blithedale Romance
3* The House of the Seven Gables
3* Twice-Told Tales
3* Wakefield
4* The Marble Faun, Vol 1
4* The Marble Faun, Vol 2
TR The Wives of the dead
TR Fanshawe
TR Ethan Brand
TR Feathertop
TR The Haunted Mind

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