Special Collection: The Works of Hugh Walpole (1884 – 1941)


From Faded Page
Author Bio for Walpole, Hugh

Sir Hugh Seymour Walpole (March 13, 1884 – June 1, 1941) was a British Novelist during the first half of the Twentieth Century. He was one of the most popular authors of his times, until his literary reputation was destroyed by Somerset Maugham.

His most famous novel is perhaps Rogue Herries, the first of four books in his Herries Chronicles series. He wrote thirty-six novels, and five volumes of short stories.

 

TITLE AUTHOR PUBLISHED
The Blind Man’s House–a Quiet Story

Walpole, Hugh

1941
Walpole’s last novel, written with his customary polish. Julius Cromwell, a blind war veteran, returns to Garth House in Glebeshire, where he had spent his youth. But accompanying him is his new wife, who is fifteen years younger. This is a major event in the peaceful existence of the village of Garth.
The Bright Pavilions (The Herries Chronicles #5)

Walpole, Hugh

1940
This fifth novel in the Herries Chronicle, set against the background of the turmoil and politics of Elizabethan England, tells the tale of one family’s experiences of divided loyalties and thwarted love.
The Captives

Walpole, Hugh

1920
The Dark Forest

Walpole, Hugh

1916
Set in Galicia at the Polish Front during WW I, the protagonist is an Englishman working for the Red Cross on the side of the Russians (a physical disability has kept him out of the armed military). He is a keen observer of human nature, profoundly empathetic and analytical, and although he is nearly always just outside the scenes of actual battle, he is absorbed with the interplay and conflicts among his fellow medics as their personalities alter and evolve under the pressure and strain of war. Walpole’s own experience with the Red Cross in WW I provided him with the background and, perhaps, the substance of his complex of characters. The oppressive maze of the forest is a nod to the dark wood of Dante and an appropriate setting for the conflicted inner self. I found the book a gripping and evocative read.
The Duchess of Wrexe: Her Decline and Death: A Romantic Commentary

Walpole, Hugh

1914
Superficially, this book is very similar to others of its type and time–a spirited girl comes out into society and must choose between her rebellious and outcast cousin or a conventional young man. Rachel chooses the conventional young man, but as their marriage begins to degenerate, she comes into contact with her cousin once more. She falls in love with him–will she leave her husband and run off with her romantic but weak lover? And looming over all of this is the spectre of her grandmother, The Duchess, an old woman whose powers and health are waning but not yet gone.
The Fortress (The Herries Chronicles #3)

Walpole, Hugh

1932
It had been the wish of her whole life to flee from all the Herries, but Walter Herries had challenged her, and she had taken up the challenge’. Judith Paris, now middle aged returns to the Lakes to deal with the bitter feud between the two branches of the family. A feud culminating in the construction by one branch of a huge house known as The Fortress, which will dominate the land of the others. But within this conflict the children of the two families have important roles to play.
The Golden Scarecrow

Walpole, Hugh

1915
Like Jeremy this book is an exercise in entering into the minds/hearts of children, but has little else in common with that book. The premise is that children come into this world with a knowledge of the world they have left behind and a spiritual link to it through a companion just referred to as their Friend. Some adults are able to mature without losing their Friend and some children push him away when they are still small. It needs the heart of a child and a willingness to believe in things we can’t see, but I think that if you are willing to give it a chance, The Golden Scarecrow will repay your effort.
The Green Mirror

Walpole, Hugh

1917
Hans Frost

Walpole, Hugh

1929
Hans Frost is a man who confronts his world from many angles. His relations with his world are multiform and the currents of the world flow into his personality from many sources. He is the point, for his hour, where age must turn its back on youth, where the individual must do battle for its separate soul, where the artist faces disintegration at the hands of adulation, and where love must find new ways of life, new strengths to beat old weaknesses.
The Inquisitor

Walpole, Hugh

1935
Walpole’s fourth and final novel about the cathedral city of Polchester, giving a panorama of the life of various citizens of that city. The author declared in his preface that he was “not afraid of melodrama.”
Jeremy and Hamlet (Jeremy Trilogy #2)

Walpole, Hugh

1923
The book begins: There was a certain window between the kitchen and the pantry that was Hamlet’s favorite. Thirty years ago-these chronicles are of the year 1894-the basements of houses in provincial English towns, even of large houses owned by rich people, were dark, chill, odorful caverns hissing with ill-burning gas and smelling of ill-cooked cabbage. The basement of the Coles’ house in Polchester was as bad as any other, but this little window between the kitchen and the pantry was higher in the wall than the other basement windows, almost on a level with the iron railings beyond it, and offering a view down over Orange Street and, obliquely, sharp to the right and past the Polchester High School, a glimpse of the Cathedral towers themselves.
Jeremy at Crale: His Friends, His Ambitions and His One Great Enemy (Jeremy Trilogy #3)

Walpole, Hugh

1927
The book begins: Young Cole, quivering with pride, surveyed the room. So, at last, was one of his deepest ambitions realized. It was not, when you looked at it, a very large room. If, as was the way with many of the other Studies, it had had a table in the middle of it, there would have been precious little space in which to move. But he and Gauntlet Ma, almost at once after their arrival last night, had come to an agreement about this. They would have their own tables in their own corners, leaving the middle of the room free-and Marlowe could lump it.
Judith Paris (The Herries Chronicles #2)

Walpole, Hugh

1931
An impetuous character, Judith Paris arouses feelings of both tenderness and despair in those around her and excites the passions of two very different men: the sturdy, affectionate Reuben, her half-cousin; and Georges, a Frenchman, whose wilful nature seems to respond to her own.
Katherine Christian (The Herries Chronicles #6)

Walpole, Hugh

1944
This novel is an unfinished addition to the “Herries” series. Hugh Walpole had become attached to the characters of the original four “Herries Chronicles” and revisited them in this book and its predecessor, “The Bright Pavilions”.
Maradick at Forty

Walpole, Hugh

1910
Portrait of a Man with Red Hair

Walpole, Hugh

1925
Stirring and fantastic is this story of an American’s adventures in the mystic town of Treliss. A psychological thriller written with dash as well as beauty. Zestful romance with a touch of allegory.

The most exciting story Walpole has written in years, with descriptions surpassing in colour the unusual character of the events.

Rogue Herries (The Herries Chronicles #1)

Walpole, Hugh

1930
The first in the Herries Chronicle saga by Hugh Walpole.

The tale of Francis Herries, the “rogue” of the title. A violent and impetuous man, a faithless husband and a capricious father, the Borrowdale valley (his home for 40 years) and his unrequited love for gypsy Mirabell Starr are the two forces which drive him.

Vanessa (The Herries Chronicles #4)

Walpole, Hugh

1933
The fourth and final volume of the Herries Chronicles, described as ‘incomparably the best’ in The Daily Telegraph is a love story of ‘effortless brilliance’ (Observer) which starts with the triumph of Judith Paris’s hundredth birthday in the 1870’s and then moves to the tragic disillusionment of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Set, predominantly, as before, amidst the grandeur of the lake district landscape, it tells the passionate and unforgettable story of Vanessa, Judith’s Granddaughter and her n’er-do-well cousin Benjie whom she had sworn in childhood never to betray.
Wintersmoon

Walpole, Hugh

1928
The story swirls around Janet, a wellbred but poor woman who marries for companionship and security. Most of the book is about the characters around her–the good intentioned Purefoys who own the ancestral estate Wintersmoon, John Beauminster and Tom Seddon from The Duchess of Wrexe and Janet’s younger, breezy sister Rosalind. Half of the book is about love, in its various forms: Janet falls in love with her husband, her husband desperately loves their son, Tom loves Rosalind but Rosalind loves no one but herself. It’s rather histrionic, but the passing of some 80 years has not rendered it a meaningless puzzle.

The other half of the book is unfortunately about Walpole’s favorite subject: the old vs the new. Janet and her new, aristocratic family stand for “Old England,” made of traditions, stiff upper lips and doing ones duty.

The Wooden Horse

Walpole, Hugh

1909
The Wooden Horse is the story of the Trojans, a family which accepted as tranquility the belief that they were the people for whom the world was created. But when Harry Trojan came home after twenty years in New Zealand, with the democracy learned by working his hands, he was the “wooden horse” who boldly carried into the Trojan walls a whole army of alien ideals, which made of that egotistic family a group of human beings content to be human.
The Young Enchanted: A Romantic Story

Walpole, Hugh

1921
An attempt to find romance in the drabness of postwar England.

The Young Enchanged is a book that takes the year 1920 and make it appear enchanged. London in 1920–and youth standing in the center of the present, with extraordinary possibilities whirling about it, ready and eager to grasp at these possibilities, anxious to try conclusions in a world made over.

Stars Henry Trenchad–the Henry who was so very young in The Green Mirror, and who is not so much older now, the years have passed and he has been through the war.

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