New ebook available @ Project Gutenberg: Mademoiselle de Maupin v. 2 by Théophile Gautier


Mademoiselle de Maupin v. 2Mademoiselle de Maupin v. 2 by Théophile Gautier

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Illustrator: Francois-Xavier Le Sueur
Édouard Toudouze

Translator: I. G. Burham

Release Date: May 8, 2015 [EBook #48893]

Language: English

Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

Produced by Laura Natal & Marc D’Hooghe at http://www.freeliterature.org (Images generously made
available by the Hathi Trust.)


Chapter XIII — How many times you have appeared to me—at the window of the mysterious chateau, leaning in melancholy mood on the balcony and throwing to the wind the petals of some flower. * * * There were your proud yet gentle eyes, your transparent hands, your lovely, waving hair and your adorably disdainful half smile.

Free download in French available at Project Gutenberg.

The original file is available at Internet Archive.

New ebook available @ Project Gutenberg: Mademoiselle de Maupin v. 1 by Théophile Gautier


Mademoiselle de Maupin v. 1Mademoiselle de Maupin v. 1 by Théophile Gautier

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Illustrator: Francois-Xavier Le Sueur
Édouard Toudouze

Translator: I. G. Burham

Release Date: May 8, 2015

Language: English

Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

Produced by Laura Natal & Marc D’Hooghe at http://www.freeliterature.org (Images generously made
available by the Hathi Trust.)

Free download in French available at Project Gutenberg.

Following Petra’s suggestion, the English version of this book, I have proofread for Free Literature (Project Gutenberg): translation I.G. Burnham.

The original file is available at Internet Archive.


Chapter III — Thereupon the ball-dress had a fine time as you can imagine; *** and I believe that fresher dress was never more pitilessly rumpled and torn; the dress was of silver gauze and the lining of white satin. Rosette displayed on that occasion a heroism altogether unusual to her sex.

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTICE

This celebrated novel, the celebrity of which has not been lessened by the very numerous editions that have been published, had a very modest beginning which in no way foreshadowed the great success which it was to obtain later.

The title: Mademoiselle de Maupin–Double Love appeared, we believe, for the first time in Renduel’s catalogue in connection with The Life of Hoffman, by Lœve-Weimars, which appeared in October, 1833, announcing the new work of Théophile Gautier as being in press. Renduel had made the acquaintance of the author at Victor Hugo’s; he had published in August, 1833, his first volume of prose, Young France, and now it was a question of launching a work in two volumes, a truly daring undertaking for a publisher of that day; especially in the case of the work of an author but little known and only twenty-two years old.

Mademoiselle de Maupin was not, however, destined to see the light so soon. For two years Théophile
Gautier, more enamored of freedom than of work, or preferring the task of making two harmonious rhymes
to all the beauties of his learned and rhythmic prose, incessantly abandoned and resumed the promised work.
A tradition preserved in the family of the poet tells how his father often shut him up in his room at that
time, forbidding him to leave it until he had completed a certain number of pages of the Grotesques or of Mademoiselle de Maupin. When the maternal kindness did not come to his aid, the frolicsome author, who then lived with his parents on Place Royale, often found the means of getting away by the window and so escaping a paternal task. Such escapades being frequently renewed, it may well be believed that the novel made but little progress; 1834 was drawing to a close; only the first of the two volumes was finished; the publisher complained, and the author tried to pacify him by notes.

Finally, in 1835, the second volume was written in six weeks on Rue du Doyenné, where the poet, having
left the paternal nest, had installed himself; the manuscript was delivered to Renduel and we read the following
note in Le Monde Dramatique, of September 20th, concerning the biography of the strange person who
really bore the name of Maupin, a biography signed by Rochefort and published in that number under the title:
Mademoiselle d’Aubigny-Maupin: “One of our collaborators, Monsieur Théophile Gautier, has been busy
for a long time on a romance entitled: Mademoiselle (de) Maupin.

New ebook available @ Project Gutenberg: Les Misérables v. 5-5 by Victor Hugo


Les Misérables v. 5-5Les Misérables v. 5-5 by Victor Hugo

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Translator: Frederic Charles Lascelles Wraxall

Release Date: April 18, 2015 [EBook #48735]

Language: English

Produced by Laura Natal & Marc D’Hooghe at http://www.freeliterature.org (Images generously made available by the Hathi Trust.)

Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

I made the proofreading the 1st edition of this book in English through Free Literature, published by Little, Brown and Company, in 1887.

Vol 5: Jean Valjean

The original file was provided by Internet Arquive .

Page 87:

“From the Tuileries to the Luxembourg there is only the distance which separates the royalty from
the peerage; and that is not far. It is going to rain musketry.”

New ebook available @ Project Gutenberg: Les Misérables v. 4-5 by Victor Hugo


Les Misérables v. 4-5Les Misérables v. 4-5 by Victor Hugo

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Translator: Frederic Charles Lascelles Wraxall

Release Date: April 18, 2015 [EBook #48734]

Language: English

Produced by Laura Natal & Marc D’Hooghe at http://www.freeliterature.org (Images generously made available by the Hathi Trust.)

Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

I made the proofreading the 1st edition of this book in English for Free Literature, published by Little, Brown and Company, in 1887.

Vol 4: The Idyll and the Epic

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Page 20:

In such a case, this is what occurs to political philosophers: at the same time as wearied men claim rest, accomplished facts demand guarantees, for guarantees for facts are the same thing as repose for men. It is this that England asked of the Stuart after the Protector, and what France asked of the Bourbons after the Empire. These guarantees are a necessity of the times, and they must be granted. The Princes concede them, but in reality it is the force of things that gives them. This is a profound truth and worth knowing, which the Stuarts did not suspect in 1662, and of which the Bourbons did not even gain a glimpse in 1814.

Page 25:

In this way they say peace is secured after the revolution, that is to say, the necessary time for repairing the house and dressing the wounds. A dynasty hides the scaffolding and covers the hospital. Now, it is not always easy to obtain a dynasty, although the first man of genius or the first adventurer met with is sufficient to make a king.

Page 261:

Slang is the language of the dark. Thought is affected in its gloomiest depths, and social philosophy is harassed in its most poignant undulations, in the presence of this enigmatical dialect, which is at once branded and in a state of revolt.

New ebook available @ Project Gutenberg: Les Misérables v. 3-5 by Victor Hugo


Les Misérables v. 3-5Les Misérables v. 3-5 by Victor Hugo

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

Translator: Frederic Charles Lascelles Wraxall

Release Date: April 18, 2015 [EBook #48733]

Language: English

Produced by Laura Natal & Marc D’Hooghe at http://www.freeliterature.org (Images generously made available by the Hathi Trust.)

I made the proofreading the 1st edition of this book in English forFree Literature, published by Little, Brown and Company, in 1887.

Vol 3: Marius

The original file was provided by Internet Arquive.

New ebook available @ Project Gutenberg: Les Misérables v. 2-5 by Victor Hugo


Les Misérables v. 2-5Les Misérables v. 2-5 by Victor Hugo

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Translator: Frederic Charles Lascelles Wraxall

Release Date: April 18, 2015 [EBook #48732]

Language: English

Produced by Laura Natal, Ingrid González Reyes & Marc D’Hooghe at http://www.freeliterature.org (Images generously made available by the Hathi Trust.)

Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

I made the proofreading the 1st edition of this book in English through Free Literature, published by Little, Brown and Company, in 1887.

Vol 2: Cosette

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Page 13:

“If you like to give me three francs, sir, I will tell you all about the battle of Waterloo.”

Page 14:

If it had not rained on the night between the 17th and 18th June, 1815, the future of Europe would have been changed; a few drops of rain more or less made Napoleon oscillate.

Page 46:

Other fatalities were yet to arise. Was it possible for Napoleon to win the battle? We answer in the negative. Why? On account of Wellington, on account of Blücher? No; on account of God. Buonaparte, victor at Waterloo, did not harmonize with the law of the 19th century.

When the earth is suffering from an excessive burden, there are mysterious groans from the shadow, which the abyss hears. Napoleon had been denounced in infinitude, and his fall was decided. He had angered God. Waterloo is not a battle, but a transformation of the Universe.

Page 66:

The man who won the battle of Waterloo was not Napoleon routed; it was not Wellington giving ground at four o’clock, driven to despair at five; it was not Blücher, who had not fought at all: the man who won the battle of Waterloo was Cambronne.

Page 78:

If you wish to understand what revolution is, call it progress; and if you wish to understand what progress is, call it to-morrow.

Page 131:

Cosette measured with the simple and sad sagacity of childhood the abyss which separated her from this doll. She said to herself that a person must be a queen or a princess to have a “thing” like that. She looked at the fine dress, the long smooth hair, and thought, “How happy that doll must be!” She could not take her eyes off this fantastic shop, and the more she looked the more dazzled she became, and she fancied she saw Paradise.

New ebook available @ Project Gutenberg: Les Misérables v. 1-5 by Victor Hugo


Les Misérables v. 1-5Les Misérables v. 1-5 by Victor Hugo

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Translator: Frederic Charles Lascelles Wraxall

Release Date: April 18, 2015 [EBook #48731]

Language: English

PART PREMIER FANTINE

BOSTON: LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY. 1887

Produced by Annemie Arnst, Ingrid González Reyes & Marc D’Hooghe at http://www.freeliterature.org

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The original file was provided by Internet Arquive.

PUBLISHERS’ PREFACE.

The present edition of “LES MISÉRABLES,” in five volumes, has been made with the special object of supplying the work in a proper form for library use, embodying the two great requisites, clear type and handy size. It is in the main a reprint of the English translation, in three volumes, by Sir Lascelles Wraxall, which was made with the sanction and advice of the author. Chapters and passages omitted in the English edition have been specially translated for the present issue; numerous errors of the press, etc., have been corrected; and the author’s own arrangement of the work in five parts, and his subdivisions into books and chapters, have been restored.
BOSTON, Sept. 1, 1887.

PREFACE

So long as, by the effect of laws and of customs, social degradation shall continue in the midst of civilization, making artificial hells, and subjecting to the complications of chance the divine destiny of man; so long as the three problems of the age,—the debasement of man by the proletariat, the ruin of woman by the force of hunger, the destruction of children in the darkness,—shall not be solved; so long as anywhere social syncope shall be possible: in other words, and from a still broader point of view, so long as ignorance and misery shall remain on earth, books like this cannot fail to be useful.
HAUTEVILLE-HOUSE, 1862.